Stresses in Beams


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Stresses in Beams
Stresses in Beams
<emphasis role="bold">Basics</emphasis> It is convenient to imagine a beam to be composed of an infinite number of thin longitudinal fibers. Each longitudinal fiber is assumed to act independently of every other fiber. The beam of Fig. 7-1, for example, will deflect downward and the fibers in the lower part of the beam undergo extension, while those in the upper part are shortened. These changes in the lengths of the fibers set up stresses in the fibers. Those that are extended have tensile …
Citation
William Nash; Merle Potter: Schaum’s Outline of Strength of Materials, Fifth Edition. Stresses in Beams, Chapter (McGraw-Hill Professional, 2011 1998 1994 1972), AccessEngineering Export